Breaking Barriers by Breaking a Sweat

Creating a routine around movement, gives us life, helps with our confidence, and is grounding on so many levels. We create routines for ourselves to save steps, ensure smooth-sailing experiences, and to take full advantage of the day. If your routines are filled with good healthy habits, they can be a wonderful thing. However, it is important to recognize if we’ve fallen into an unproductive rut. Though it may sound contradictory to the definition of routine - is a series of habits - the most important thing we can do to ensure healthy living is to allow our routines to be malleable. A shoe is only good for as long as it fits; the same is true of routine.

Though it may sound contradictory to the definition of routine - is a series of habits - the most important thing we can do to ensure healthy living is to allow our routines to be malleable.

Changing the norm holds enormous benefits. Trying new things allows you to discover what you do and don’t like, which gives you the opportunity to get to know yourself better. It taps into your courage and provides room for growth. It creates more possibilities for enjoyment and leads you away from boredom. 

For the gym goers and gym avoiders alike, a great way to start challenging your routine is to break some barriers by breaking a sweat. We live in a world where there’s a gym in every town, if not on every street. There are hundreds of outdoor sports from rock climbing to hiking, there are even sports that were born in fictional books and have now come to life. There are thousands of activities just waiting to be tried, but finding one that proves both enjoyable and challenging in your current season of life is what will not only inspire you, but will keep you active even on those cold days.

To begin bending your habits during this season, allow yourself a break from going to the gym every day after work and instead, throw a pair of cross country skis in your car for a little after-work ride. 

As we find ourselves in the midst of a season change, we are provided with a gentle push to begin breaking barriers. Here in Montana, we’ve already seen a bit of snow and can easily expect much, much more. To begin bending your habits during this season, allow yourself a break from going to the gym every day after work and instead, throw a pair of cross country skis in your car for a little after-work ride. Perhaps on the weekend instead of escaping the cold by retreating to your house, try renting a snowboard and giving it a shot. Sweating may seem impossible when it’s only 10 degrees out, but many of these outdoor sports can really get the blood pumping. It helps if you’re all bundled up, too! 

When you choose to break barriers by breaking a sweat, the benefits do not stop at challenging and enjoying yourself. Sweating itself has wonderful benefits for the skin. Check out our blog post, The Healing Power of...Perspiration? to learn more about the benefits of sweating. 

Sometimes we just need to take that first step to begin something wonderfully new.

Perhaps we’ve convinced you to try something new and you’re ready to get after it. Maybe you’re still feeling a little skeptical. We get it. Even if there are benefits, trying something new can still induce a sense of fear. It can feel extremely vulnerable to mold your old routine into something new. Often times, the biggest drawback is trying something new by yourself. It can often feel safer to try something new in a community. One of the easiest ways to do this is to invite your friends to go with you on that cross country skiing outing you were thinking of going on, attend a beginner’s yoga class, or sign up for those group ice climbing lessons you’ve been thinking about. 

We live in a world ready to fill us with experience, knowledge and passion. Sometimes we just need to take that first step to begin something wonderfully new. Take charge of your routine and be kind to your body and mind throughout your new journey: break barriers to break a sweat. 

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