Nourish to Soothe: Reducing Skin Inflammation Through Diet

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The modern woman lathers, rinses, exfoliates, tones, dabs, and then repeats, on a daily basis. Our relationships with our skin are complicated, tenuous at times. The skin care professionals at Sageborn know this affair all too well, and we’re committed to providing natural skin care products that promote the best relationship you can have with your skin. But, we wonder: for all the tightropes we walk on the surface, what kind of safety net do we build underneath ourselves to support beautiful skin? At Sageborn, we view our line of products as one piece of a multi-faceted approach to skincare, knowing that it’s not just what we put on our skin, but also what we put in our bodies that affects our radiance.

We wonder: for all the tightropes we walk on the surface, what kind of safety net do we build underneath ourselves to support beautiful skin?

So let’s talk about inflammation. The word floats around us daily on the news, with rising rates of bodily inflammatory responses in western society affecting everything from our joints to our hearts. That inflammation is also the root of many of the skin issues we work so hard to treat. There are two types of skin inflammation to consider: chronic inflammation and acute inflammation. Chronic skin inflammation includes eczema, psoriasis, and rosacea. Acute skin inflammation, on the other hand, is irritation that typically occurs for a shorter period of time and is the result of a variety of factors including allergic reactions, sun exposure, and acne. Even mild redness and flaky skin, though, can be a sign that inflammation is at play. With products like our Rejuvenating Facial Oil, steeped in vitamins and antioxidants proven to reduce many of the results of skin inflammation, we’ve got you covered on the surface, so let’s take a look at what we can do about inflammation from within.

The word floats around us nightly on the news, with rising rates of bodily inflammatory responses in western society affecting everything from our joints to our hearts. That inflammation is also at the root of many of the skin issues we work so hard to treat.

The processed foods so prevalent in our culture, like refined carbohydrates, fried foods, an abundance of sugar and salt, and foods with casein (cow’s milk dairy) are all linked to inflammation. On the opposite end of the nutrition spectrum, eating whole foods and healthy fats have been proven effective in naturally reducing inflammation. The list of delicious foods with anti-inflammatory properties is long and growing everyday. Here are a few of our favorite additions to an anti-inflammatory diet:

Eat the Rainbow.

Whole, plant-based foods of every shade are a veritable pot-o-gold of anti-inflammatory benefits.

Tomatoes lend a healthy dose of lycopene, an antioxidant with important anti-inflammatory properties.

Carrots, sweet potatoes, and squash are loaded with fiber, beta-carotene, and vitamin A, which can help heal inflammation in the body.

Leafy greens and all cruciferous vegetables including broccoli, cauliflower and brussels sprouts contain sulforaphane, an antioxidant that fights inflammation by reducing levels of cytokines and NF-kB, which drive inflammation.

Berries, especially blueberries, are rich anthocyanins, another antioxidant compound with anti-inflammatory properties. Grapes and cherries also contain anthocyanins.

The processed foods so prevalent in our culture, like refined carbohydrates, fried foods, an abundance of sugar and salt, and foods with casein (cow’s milk dairy) are all linked to inflammation.

Soak Up Healthy Fats and Omega-3s.

Salmon, sardines and other fatty fish, as well as walnuts and flax seeds, contain high levels of inflammation-reducing omega-3s.

Choose extra virgin olive oil in place of trans and saturated fats. Avocados and almonds are other sources of healthy oils, and avocado oil has even been shown to help the body absorb more nutrients.

Keep It Spicy.

Many spices have been proven to help reduce inflammation, but at the top of the list are turmeric, cayenne, and ginger. Turmeric, often found in curry blends, contains curcumin, which is said to have the same anti-inflammatory effect as over-the-counter pain relievers. Similarly, ginger has been proven to reduce pain associated with inflammation, as well as aid digestion. Cayenne contains antioxidant flavonoids and carotenoids that protect against the cellular damage that leads to inflammation.

On a crisp fall day, warm the soul and kick-start the skin-calming effects of an anti-inflammatory diet, with Roasted Curry-Spiced Vegetables.

Ingredients:
1 cauliflower head, cut into small florets
2 sweet potatoes, cut into 1-inch cubes
4 carrots, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 red onion, cut into 1-inch pieces
4 garlic cloves, chopped
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 tablespoon curry powder
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 teaspoon whole cumin seeds
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
Directions:
Heat oven to 400º
Combine all the vegetables and garlic in a mixing bowl. Toss with curry powder, smoked paprika, cumin seeds, kosher salt, freshly ground black pepper, and extra virgin olive oil. Mix until vegetables are coated.
Arrange the vegetables in a single layer on a lined baking sheet and place on the center rack of the oven.
Turn everything after 15 minutes and continue roasting until the vegetables are tender when pierced, about 30 minutes total.
Remove roasted vegetables from oven. Taste to adjust seasoning as needed.
 

Recommended Daily Ritual:

Supple, smooth skin is fed by a balanced diet of mostly whole foods, with reduced amounts of sodium and saturated fats.

Nourish your skin and your tastebuds with a daily dose (or even better- three daily doses) of bright colors, spices and healthy fats.

 

anti-aging balance calming healing healthy eating healthy skin inflammation natural recipes skin care wellness

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  • So refreshing to read content from a skincare co that addresses the importance of what you put IN to you body! Thank you!
    Kirsten
    Whitefish, MT

    Kirsten on

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